Culturally safe healthcare and its importance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

Culturally safe healthcare and its importance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

28 January 2020
Discussion with Professor Roianne West

Providing healthcare which is culturally safe is important to address the disparities in health outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and non-Indigenous Australians.

The Australian Dental Council Chief Executive Officer, Narelle Mills sat with Professor Roianne West, Dean, First Peoples Health Unit, Griffith University, and member of the accreditation standards review working party, to discuss the challenges faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in accessing culturally safe health care.

Learn more in the video below.

The ADC is committed to using its position to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

Under this commitment, the ADC, in conjunction with the Dental Council (New Zealand), has identified cultural safety as a focus of the review of the Accreditation Standards. The revisions to the ADC/DC(NZ) accreditation standards for dental practitioner programs are aimed at ensuring programs produce graduates able to provide culturally safe care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

Consultation on the proposed changes to the Standards is scheduled to take place in early 2020. More information about the review is available here.

Accreditation Standards Review